Timing Depends on Goals — Relevance Rules

Thanks to marketing master Dan Zarrella for pointing out this obvious (but often overlooked) clue to relevance  — look at behavior to date.

As a complement to last week’s guidance on when to post, email and tweet (when other’s aren’t, for the most part), he adds these “it depends” guidelines on when to blog.
Of course now you have multiple  factors to consider —

1) When your target audiences have their open-minded moments, and are most likely to listen or read or discuss what your organization has to say (nothing is more important that this. Discovering what these moments are is vital — your knowledge is your guiding light.

2) When to time posts (or email, Facebook updates, tweets,) so that they aren’t lost in the crush of content. Look at your usage stats, and the habits and preferences of your target audiences to pinpoint timing.

3) When to time blog posts, which depends on whether you’re seeking comments, links (to spread the word), or views. No surprise that:

  • Early am (about 7 is ideal for getting your posts in front of other online bloggers, tweeters, and others who may spread the word.
  • 8am is ideal for motivating comments (before most folks are overwhelmed by the daily to-dos.
  • 10am is the peak for readers (and potential subscribers)

As Zarrella says, his recommendations are based on millions of data points, and may not, in fact, be the best for your nonprofit. But I’m confident in saying that you’ll find the right times to release each your communications on each channel only through 1) deep-dive getting to know your audiences; 2) tracking and analyzing usage stats; 3) ongoing fine-tuning.

Dive in!

P.S. Messages that connect are a priority for all organizations and the prerequisite for motivating your base to act. Learn how to craft the most essential message — your tagline. Download the Nonprofit Tagline Report and Database for must-dos, don’t dos, case studies and 5,000 searchable nonprofit tagline examples!

Nancy Schwartz on January 23, 2012 in Relevance Rules | 0 comments

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