pamela grow

LisaSargent 2.1

Guest blogger Lisa Sargent is one of the best fundraisers and copywriters I know. She focuses here on donor communications, but her take is relevant for all nonprofit campaigns and audiences. Read on, and we up!

Lately it’s been that the 24/7 donor communications fiesta … is getting a little tired.

Same old players, same old info, recycled the same old ways: more you/less we, Flesch Kincaid and readability, ban all jargon, timely thank-yous, and on and on and on.

Then Nancy Schwartz wrote this. She said:

“[It’s] about WE…not you. This is a critical shift in voice that I’m starting to feel is very important.

For so long, experts have advised cause communicators to address prospects and supporters in second person—you. The shift to WE—signaling the power of collective action for stronger results—is a vital strategic shift.”

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Nancy Schwartz on June 9, 2015 in Messaging, Relevance Rules | 2 comments
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With Thanksgiving  upon us, all attention turns to gratitude (or at least the recognition that we should be thankful, for something).

I’m grateful to New York Times columnist John Tierney for cutting through the gratitude flotsam:

Cultivating an attitude of gratitude has been linked to better health, sounder sleep, less anxiety and depression, higher long term satisfaction with life and kinder behavior to others, including romantic partners. One study stated that writing just one sentence of five things you are grateful for once a week made people happier and more optimistic than the control group. They also reported fewer physical problems, slept longer at night and were also less aggressive.

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Nancy Schwartz on November 22, 2011 in Strategy | 0 comments
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I’m hosting the Nonprofit Blog Carnival this month, and would like to invite all bloggers to share your “one book” recommendation.

Please blog on:
What single book (not blog, not conversation, not Facebook page) has changed your life as a nonprofit staffer, consultant or vendor? Plus the why and how. Write and submit your “one book” post today, while it’s on your mind. Deadline is May 27.

On May 31, my blog post will feature summaries and links to posts on these “one books,” and a few of the dozens of responses from other nonprofit professionals.

Your “one book” can be focused on a topic far outside nonprofit topics, if it’s moved you forward in your nonprofit work. For an example of a fantastic post on this theme, take a look at this post by Pamela Grow.

WHAT’S YOUR ONE BOOK?
A few weeks ago, long-time colleague Steve Damiano, Director of Professional Development at New York City’s Support Center for Nonprofit Management, asked me to recommend a few marketing books for his nephew, soon to graduate with a marketing degree. Four titles quickly came to mind, a flow that made me realize that this is an ideal topic for the Nonprofit Blog Carnival.

And I’ll publish the compilation as a reading list for our community, based on your posts.

The deadline is May 27.

You can enter your submission in one of two ways:

1. You can fill out the carnival form here
2. You can email a link to the post to nonprofitcarnival (at) gmail.com

P.S. Here’s my “one book” — looks dry as dust but…

Nancy Schwartz on May 17, 2011 in Professional Development | 4 comments
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fundraisingThis afternoon, a client asked me about to share my top fundraising resources. Her organization is shifting gears, re-orienting its focus to
better match audience wants and interests, and eager to find funding to make it happen.

In crafting this list, I realized it may be of interest to you and that I’d like to know where you turn for fundraising guidance. Do keep in mind that my core learning strategy is to read/listen to (and talk with, when possible) the best heads on a topic. I learn most easily from case studies that give me the specifics I need to relate what I’m learning to the client project at hand.

Here are my top six fundraising guides. Please share your favorites now in the comments box below (click comments link at bottom or, if you’re looking at the permalink version of this post, just scroll down to bottom):

  • Tom Ahern–Lots of great case studies and fundraising models analyzed and annotated. Easy to learn from, and absolutely on point.
  • Tom Belford & Roger Craver:The Agitator–These guys love to present multiple points of view on a topic which makes the reader work, in a good way. Again, case studies, strategy and a wicked sense of humor.
  • Jeff Brooks: Future Fundraising Now–Formerly blogging at Donor Power, the incredible Jeff Brooks is cranking out almost-daily to-dos now, and every one is golden. Go, Jeff, go!
  • Network for Good: Fundraising 123–This online donation service goes way beyond their donate button to provide top-quality articles and webinars (all free) to strengthen fundraising and marketing skills.
  • Pamela Grow: Grantwriting Blog–Pamela brings a fresh perspective to her sage fundraising advice, as in today’s post pointing out how nonprofit fundraisers can learn (what NOT to do) from Food Network star Paula Deen. Good learning that’s fun and provocative, with lots of examples.

Click on the Comments link below to add the fundraising guides you rely on, and to read about the very important 7th guide I forgot to mention in this post.

P.S. Marketing and fundraising are two halves of a whole. Get more in-depth articles, case studies and guides to
nonprofit marketing success — all featured in the twice-monthly
Getting Attention e-update.
Subscribe today .

Nancy Schwartz on March 26, 2010 in Fundraising: Innovations & Research | 34 comments
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