audience-focus

I’d appreciate your help. I’m finishing up a presentation on high-impact nonprofit e-newsletters, to be delivered next week to a group of NY metro area organizations.

The participants range widely in their nonprofit marketing expertise, as they do in their interests and needs on the topic. Always the case, right?

A reliable strategy I use to make a workshop valuable for those of diverse experience levels is integrating many case studies. Everyone can learn from them, no matter their level of experience. So I ask…

What are the top two e-newsletters you get from nonprofit orgs, and what makes each one successful? Please comment by clicking the comments link under this post or email me directly.

Thanks much for your input! In a few weeks, I’ll share out the list you provide of  great nonprofit e-newsletters and the keys to their success.

P.S. Learn how to strengthen your e-newsletter here:

Nancy Schwartz in Email and E-Newsletters | 1 comment
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It's About Them -- Your Network -- Not Your Org, So Shape Your Messages AccordinglyYour network (my new word of choice for your audience/base/supporters) has to be your organization’s guiding light, 24/7. Because if what you do, and how you say it, doesn’t interest with their interests and needs, your organization is dead in the water. (FYI — that intersection is your brand, but that’s another post.)

When you craft messages, it’s imperative that they resonate with your network. Not that your organization doesn’t have some very real needs that may have nothing to do with the outside world, but either you find the meet with your audiences or your communications fail.

Take a look at these crystal-clear examples of what works (that intersection) and what doesn’t: These are email subject lines from three organizations, each asking me to respond to an online survey:

  • XXX Religious School needs your opinion! (thumbs down)
  • What do you need? (thumbs up)
  • How can we help your child? (thumbs up)

Each subject line makes the same request, but the first one does so from the point-of-view of the organization, whereas the latter two do from from the reader’s perspective. The benefit is clear; I can guarantee you that these latter two surveys generated a much higher level of participation — the organizations behind them are so focused on their audiences that the audiences are bound to respond more eagerly. Everyone loves attention, and to be understood.

My prediction? Extend this focus to all of your work — program and communications — and your organization will flourish.

P.S. Don’t miss out on the in-depth articles, case studies and guides on branding, messages and more featured in the twice-monthly Getting Attention e-update. Subscribe today.

Photo: Flickr Moog

Nancy Schwartz in Branding and Messages | 2 comments
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