survey

First of all, let me thank you for all of the questions, stories and feedback you share with me on an ongoing basis. It’s your input that makes it possible for me to cover what you need to know to increase your nonprofit’s marketing impact!

I’d like to end the year by asking you to respond to a simple but vital question: What’s the biggest marketing lesson you learned (or re-learned) in 2010?

It could be anything tactical or strategic, simple or complex. Some examples might be:

  • Don’t fail to get a final proof before sending a brochure to the printer
  • Do an A/B split (comparing response on two versions) on a fundraising campaign landing page on your website before rolling out the campaign
  • Don’t change your messaging but forget to train front-line and program staffers about the new way to talk about your organization.

Whatever comes to mind as a lesson or key principle learned—either from hard knocks or new found success. Just enter your lesson learned here.

I’ll summarize the trends, and share the lessons submitted by you and your colleagues, in the 2011 Nonprofit Marketing Wisdom Report (hat tip to Marketing Sherpa). You’ll get a free copy when you share your biggest marketing lesson learned!

Please take one minute to share your thoughts and insights now.

Thanks so much!

Nancy Schwartz in Strategy | 1 comment
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It's About Them -- Your Network -- Not Your Org, So Shape Your Messages AccordinglyYour network (my new word of choice for your audience/base/supporters) has to be your organization’s guiding light, 24/7. Because if what you do, and how you say it, doesn’t interest with their interests and needs, your organization is dead in the water. (FYI — that intersection is your brand, but that’s another post.)

When you craft messages, it’s imperative that they resonate with your network. Not that your organization doesn’t have some very real needs that may have nothing to do with the outside world, but either you find the meet with your audiences or your communications fail.

Take a look at these crystal-clear examples of what works (that intersection) and what doesn’t: These are email subject lines from three organizations, each asking me to respond to an online survey:

  • XXX Religious School needs your opinion! (thumbs down)
  • What do you need? (thumbs up)
  • How can we help your child? (thumbs up)

Each subject line makes the same request, but the first one does so from the point-of-view of the organization, whereas the latter two do from from the reader’s perspective. The benefit is clear; I can guarantee you that these latter two surveys generated a much higher level of participation — the organizations behind them are so focused on their audiences that the audiences are bound to respond more eagerly. Everyone loves attention, and to be understood.

My prediction? Extend this focus to all of your work — program and communications — and your organization will flourish.

P.S. Don’t miss out on the in-depth articles, case studies and guides on branding, messages and more featured in the twice-monthly Getting Attention e-update. Subscribe today.

Photo: Flickr Moog

Nancy Schwartz in Branding and Messages | 2 comments
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